-1
archive,tax-portfolio_category,term-residential,term-51,stockholm-core-2.3.2,select-child-theme-ver-1.0.0,select-theme-ver-9.0,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,side_area_over_content,,qode_menu_,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-6.9.0,vc_responsive

Archive

  • Sort Blog:
  • All
  • Articles
  • On The Boards/Current Work
  • Weekly Update

Pleasant Beach House

Nestled on the edge of an estuary, the Pleasant Beach House is a combination of two vernacular farmhouse forms.  The placement of the daytime and nighttime wings at 90 degrees to one another creates two sides of a large outdoor room offering views of Rich Passage over a pocket park.

The daytime wing – an open, light-filled space designed to maximize views and accommodate the needs of a busy young family and guests  – includes kitchen, dining and living spaces. The southern face of this wing is shielded by a 10′ deep cantilevered canopy which protects from direct sunlight or rain, and facilitates use and enjoyment of the outdoor space during warmer weather.  A diner-style pass-through bar located on the kitchen side of the covered terrace further enhances the use of this terrace area.

Four bedrooms, plus bathrooms, laundry and mudroom with entry via the garage make up the home’s nighttime wing.  Breathtaking views are available from the  master bedroom and bath, while the kid’s bedrooms feature modest views, generous play and study spaces, and shared bathrooms.

Contractor

2atara Construction

Photographer

Kelvin Hughes Productions

Port Madison House

Elegant, functional, eye-pleasing forms employed for centuries by inhabitants of the Puget Sound inspired the design of the Port Madison House.

Simple shed forms—and the resultant openness and volume such shapes afford—provide the perfect framework in which to celebrate light, air, and views. The three sheds in this design have different functions. Daytime spaces in the main shed include living, dining and kitchen areas.  Sleeping quarters are located in the nocturnal wing, while the third shed accommodates vehicles and sports equipment for an active and growing family.

Contractor

Paul Olgilvie Construction

Photographer

Jeff Amram Photography

Winslow House

Winslow House

Designed for empty nesters, this 2,300-square-foot home features a ground-level master bedroom for aging in place and a 305-square-foot bedroom above the single car garage to accommodate guests or a future caregiver. The home’s daytime pavilion houses the kitchen, home office, living, and dining spaces, while the nocturnal wing includes the master bedroom and two smaller bedrooms on the upper level. Windows placed on the corners of the house give the impression that the structure was carved from a solid mass.

Contractor

Clark Construction LLC

Photographer

Ben Benschneider Photography

White Point House

This 5,000-square-foot home was constructed after a fire destroyed most of the original log structure. The new home is a hybrid log/conventional construction that derives most of its energy needs from on-site solar and geothermal sources and looks nothing like the kit house that once rested on the property. The new work—a rich blend of stone, log and cedar shingles—maintains the owner’s desire for a rustic aesthetic and utilizes massing, scale and rhythm appropriate to the environment and the owner’s intended uses.

Contractor

Greenway Construction

Photographer

Martin Bydelek Photography

The Landing House

This Montana home evolved from two Perfect Little House Company stock plans. The plans were modified by BC&J Architecture for a traditional neighborhood development (TND) on Flathead Lake. Home and garage are linked through a glazed connection which frames views of the landscape and lake beyond. A Galvalum metal roof, white-painted board-and-batten gable ends, horizontal siding, and columns juxtaposed with wood decks and concrete retaining walls together create a modern farmhouse appeal. Exterior soffits and window sashes painted in a contrasting color add visual interest.

Photographer

Gibeon Photography

Sunrise Beach House - BC&J Architects

Sunrise Beach House

The design of this 4,000-square-foot house takes cues from the Arts and Crafts Movement. The home includes a number of unique spaces for the owner’s family, such as music rooms, children’s homework area, guest suite and office quarters. A generous covered porch and open patio space nestled into the beach offer seclusion and privacy. BC&J designed the house for a client who was living and working in England at the time. Communication, understanding and trust were key to the project’s success.

Contractor

Port Blakely Builders

Photographer

Brian Francis Photography

South Puget Sound House - BC&J Architects

South Puget Sound House

At 3,200 square feet (including a whimsical Crow’s Nest), this summer cabin is all about family and fun. Above the 660-square-foot water toys-filled garage, there is a 500-square-foot bunk room for visiting friends and family. The bunk room is connected to the main house by a bridge where built-in storage frames a window seat overlooking the property.

Playful details throughout the house recall the waterfront locale. These include paddles integrated into the stair railing system, engineered flooring with a weathered look, marine cleats as hardware, a boardwalk to the main entry and a nautical lighting package.

Contractor

Fujita Construction

Photographer

Ben Benschneider Photography

South Beach House - BC&J Architects

South Beach House

The design of this house evolved from a sketch provided by the owner. The owner envisioned a classic Italian country home settled into the land over generations. The main body of the house is separated from the garage and a 650-square-foot studio by the stone base of an upper terrace with views of the water. The sense that the house could have expanded over time and generations is reinforced by breaks in the massing. This Northwest interpretation of an Italian villa is situated on a narrow lot on the water’s edge and is designed to capture abundant natural light.

Contractor

Reese Construction LLC

Photographer

Ben Benschneider Photography

Rockaway Beach House - BC&J Architects

Rockaway Beach House

A small beach cottage constructed in the 1920’s was remodeled and expanded to create this Rockaway Beach residence. Following the owner’s vision, BC&J worked to maintain a visual connection to the water and Seattle beyond, while honoring the look and feel of the shingled cottages found along the Puget Sound coastline in the early part of the 20th century.

The two bedroom house includes daytime living spaces on the ground level and a sunroom with views of Mt. Baker and Mt. Rainier.

Contractor

W M Corbin Construction

Photographer

Michael Seidel Photography